Orthopaedic Institute Of Ohio
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Orthopaedic Institute Of Ohio
 
Lloyd C. Briggs, Jr., M.D., M.S. Lloyd C. Briggs, Jr., M.D., M.S.
Grace R. Dasari, M.D. Grace R. Dasari, M.D.
Frank E. Fumich, M.D. Frank E. Fumich, M.D.
Steven P. Haman, M.D. Steven P. Haman, M.D.
Nathan T. Hensley, DPM Nathan T. Hensley, DPM
Mark G. McDonald, M.D. Mark G. McDonald, M.D.
Joseph R. Misson, M.D. Joseph R. Misson, M.D.
Michael J. Muha, M.D. Michael J. Muha, M.D.
James M. Nieman, M.D. James M. Nieman, M.D.
James A. O'Neill, M.D. James A. O'Neill, M.D.
Sam M. Patel, M.D. Sam M. Patel, M.D.
James J. Patterson, M.D. James J. Patterson, M.D.
William A. Sanko, M.D. William A. Sanko, M.D.
Gary M. Schniegenberg, M.D. Gary M. Schniegenberg, M.D.
Dr. St. Clair Selvon F. St. Clair, MD, Phd
Michael J. Wieser, M.D. Michael J. Wieser, M.D.
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Diagnostics

Arthroscopy - MRI - Bone Densitometry - Electromyography
Nerve Conduction Velocity - Radiology - CT Scan (Computed Tomography)

Arthroscopy Examinations and Procedures

Arthroscopy is a surgical procedure orthopaedic surgeons use to visualize, diagnose and treat problems inside a joint.

In an arthroscopic examination, an orthopaedic surgeon makes a small incision in the patient's skin and then inserts pencil-sized instruments that contain a small lens and lighting system to magnify and illuminate the structures inside the joint. Light is transmitted through fiber optics to the end of the arthroscope that is inserted into the joint. By attaching the arthroscope to a miniature television camera, the surgeon is able to see the interior of the joint through this very small incision rather than a large incision needed for surgery.

The television camera attached to the arthroscope displays the image of the joint on a television screen, allowing the surgeon to look, for example, throughout the knee - at cartilage and ligaments, and under the kneecap. The surgeon can determine the amount or type of injury, and then repair or correct the problem, if necessary.

  • Arthroscopic procedures performed at OIO
  • Arthroscopy of the knee for tears of the meniscal cartilage
  • Arthroscopic meniscal repair
  • Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction
  • Arthroscopic Patella (kneecap) realignment
  • Posterior Ligament Cruciate reconstruction
  • Arthroscopic Articular Cartilage transplantation

Please click here for more information regarding arthroscopy.


Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a painless way to look inside your body without using ionizing radiation. Instead, it uses a large magnetic field, radiowaves and a computer to scan your body and produce detailed images that are not visible on conventional X-rays.

MRI can lead to early detection and treatment of disease and has no known side-effects. MRI makes it possible to see certain types of tissue and can provide important information about the brain, spine, joints, and internal organs.

What is an MRI?

The Orthopaedic Institute of Ohio has a New Generation Open MRI scanner with a enlarged opening and a shorter bore. This scanner has no weight limit and is more comfortable for claustrophobic patients.

How Does an MRI Scanner Work?

Your body is composed of small particles called atoms. Hydrogen atoms, or water, make up 95 percent of the body. Normally, the hydrogen atoms within your body spin around at random. However, when you are placed inside a strong magnetic field, the hydrogen atoms line up and spin in the same direction. When a radiowave is passed through the body, the hydrogen gives off a signal. That signal, with the aid of a computer, becomes the source of MRI information. It produces the images that will assist your physician in making a diagnosis and planning a treatment.

Why is an MRI Important?

MRI offers a non-invasive way to obtain information about your body that may otherwise not be as easily seen. It can lead to early detection and treatment of disease and has no known side effects. MRI makes it possible to see certain types of tissue and can provide important information about the brain, spine, joints, and internal organs.

What Can I Expect?

When your doctor refers you for an MRI exam, it's important to tell your doctor if you have a pacemaker, think you may be pregnant or have any other implants that could interfere with the procedure. Inform your doctor if you have a history of claustrophobia (fear of closed-in places). Also, please tell him/her if you are a machinist, welder, auto mechanic or work with metal in any capacity. It is very important to let your physician know if you even suspect you have anything metallic within your body, such as surgical clips, joint or bone pins, metal plates or unremoved bullets, shrapnel or BB shots. These materials may interfere with the examination.

No one with a cardiac pacemaker, ferro magnetic aneurysm clip, implanted neurostimulator, or metal foreign object in their eye will be allowed into the scanner room.

What Happens During the Examination?

Before the scan, a technologist will assist you onto an automatic scanning table. You may be asked to change into a gown for the exam. For the procedure, you simply lie on a table inside a large circular tunnel. You will hear loud knocking noises like a drumbeat while the scan is in progress, and it is important to remain still at this time.

A speaker is installed in the magnet to allow you to communicate with the technologist during the procedure if you wish. Head phones are provided for you to listen to music, so bring your favorite music CD!

How Long Does It Take?

The exam typically takes 30-60 minutes, which passes quickly. It's over before you know it! Some people even go to sleep. When the exam is complete, the technologist will help you off the table and show you where to collect your personal belongings.

After the Exam

After your exam at the Orthopaedic Institute of Ohio your MRI will be read by a Board Certified radiologist.


Bone Densitometry

The only sure way to determine bone density and fracture risk is to have a bone density test. A bone density test measures the strength and density of your bones as you approach menopause and, when the test is repeated sometime later, can help determine how quickly you are losing bone mass and density.

The Orthopaedic Institute of Ohio has a new Lunar DPX Bone Densitometer. This will detect and monitor low bone density in a comfortable, quick, safe, and precise manner.


Electromyography (EMG)

If you have been referred for a special test called a "Electromyography (EMG)," your referring physician is requesting an evaluation of your muscles and nerves.

The EMG test typically involves placing a teflon coated pin into a number of your muscles. Your muscles will be tested while resting and during contraction so your cooperation is important for obtaining accurate results. The pin itself is very thin which helps minimize your discomfort during the exam. The number of muscles which will be tested can range from a few to many. It is important to emphasize that testing can be terminated at any time per your request. Because the skin is punctured, we need to know if you have a bleeding disorder or are taking "blood thinning" drugs such as Coumadin.

Please dress comfortably for the appointment. Consider bringing a pair of shorts if your legs are going to be tested. On the day of the test, please do not use any lotions or oils because they can interfere with the testing.


Nerve Conduction Velocity (NCV)

If you have been referred for a special test called a "Nerve Conduction Velocity (NCV)," your referring physician is requesting an evaluation of your muscles and nerves.

The NCV test involves electrical stimulation of a peripheral nerve with recording of the response typically using surface electrodes. The electrical stimulation can be mildly uncomfortable, but is usually tolerated without difficulty. Because electricity is involved, we need to know if you have a cardiac pacemaker or any other synthetic device leading to your heart such as a venous or arterial catheter. If you have one of these devices, please call OIO at 419-222-6622 prior to your appointment and we can discuss your situation.

Please dress comfortably for the appointment. Consider bringing a pair of shorts if your legs are going to be tested. On the day of the test, please do not use any lotions or oils because they can interfere with the testing.


Radiology

The radiology department at the Orthopaedic Institute of Ohio has two state of the art digital radiography units. All x-rays and MRI studies performed at OIO are immediately accessible for the physician’s review; allowing diagnosis and treatment to begin. If you have further questions; please feel free to contact the office at 419-222-6622 for more details.


CT Scan (Computed Tomography)

Computed tomography, more commonly known as CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of the body.

The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD.

CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels typically provide greater detail than traditional x-rays, particularly of soft tissues and blood vessels.

Physicians often use the CT examination to quickly identify injuries to the muscular skeleton system, lungs, heart and vessels, liver, spleen, kidneys, bowel or other internal organs in cases of trauma.

Benefits:

  • CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate
  • A major advance of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time
  • Unlike conventional x-rays, CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones and blood vessels
  • CT examinations are fast and simple. In emergency cases they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives
  • CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems
  • CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI
  • CT can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI

 

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